bookporn:

Jorge Luis Borges


T F m
March 28, 2012

I wondered whether giving more than 10 minutes of every class period to reading books of our own choosing was a good idea or not. But you loved it so. You asked for more time. Ask again; I will give you whatever you need. I will also give you the best advice I can, advice from the Nobel Prize-winning writer, Juan Ramón Jiménez. Ray Bradbury thought this was so important, he used it as the epigraph at the beginning of Fahrenheit 451: “When they give you lined paper, write the other way.”


T F m
March 25, 2012

youmightfindyourself:

In 1967, Kathrine Switzer was the first woman to run the Boston marathon. After realizing that a woman was running, race organizer Jock Semple went after Switzer shouting, “Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers.” However, Switzer’s boyfriend and other male runners provided a protective shield during the entire marathon.The photographs taken of the incident made world headlines, and Kathrine later won the NYC marathon with a time of 3:07:29.


T F m
March 25, 2012

And here’s the really scary part, kids: The questions you were asked were written to elicit a personal response, which, if provided, earn you no credit. You were tricked; we were tricked. I wish I could believe that this paradox (you know what that literary term means because we have spent the year noting these kinds of tightropings of language) was simply the stupidity of the test-makers, that it was not some more insidious and deliberate machination. I wish I could believe that. But I don’t. I told you, didn’t I, about hearing Noam Chomsky speak recently? When the great man was asked about the chaos in public education, he responded quickly, decisively, and to the point: “Public education in this country is under attack.” The words, though chilling, comforted me in a weird way. I’d been feeling, the past few years of my 30-plus-year tenure in public education, that there was something or somebody out there, a power of a sort, that doesn’t really want you kids to be educated. I felt a force that wants you ignorant and pliable, and that needs you able to fill in the boxes and follow instructions. Now I’m sure.


T F m
March 25, 2012

This might be a little presumptuous of me to say but I feel as though the visual arts movements are far behind the music movements. It seems as though we are in the stages of using synthesizers and visual information is starting to look fragmented and appropriated much like when electronic music began to popularize in the 70’s. I learn more about visual art by listening to Brian Eno, for example, talk about his processes in music versus listening to some pompous elitist art critic dick. I think that the visual arts are going to get more exciting, and it’s not going to die, like some critics predict. I strongly feel as though we are in the “synthesizing stage,” in a visual-technologically advanced culture.

Jessie Thatcher (via jessiethatcher)

T F m
March 25, 2012

All creativity is an extended form of a joke. Most creativity is a transition from one context into another where things are more surprising. There’s an element of surprise, and especially in science, there is often laughter that goes along with the “Aha.” Art also has this element. Our job is to remind us that there are more contexts than the one that we’re in—the one that we think is reality.


T F m
March 25, 2012

The future is already here—it’s just not evenly distributed.

William Gibson (via wilwheaton)

T F m
March 25, 2012

rereading, an operation contrary to the commercial and ideological habits of our society, which would have us ‘throw away’ the story once it has been consumed…so that we can then move on to another story, buy another book…, re-reading is here suggested at the outset, for it alone saves the text from repetition (those who fail to reread are obliged to read the same story everywhere).

roland barthes, s/z

This should probably, speaking of contemporary society, be extended to all types of texts (movies, images, music etc.). I feel a bit naïve saying this, but I’ve always felt a bit odd for liking to reread and rewatch (especially rewatch) things, a practice I think is utterly underrated. When “new” is always deemed “good”, you tend to put less attention on the “re-actions” of things. Why spend 2 hours on a movie you already seen? On a book you already read?

I love rereading. I just hadn’t put it into words till now. On the other hand, I might’ve got it all wrong, Foucault is probably as close to semiotics as I’ll ever get, and Barthes only make sense to me when he gets personal with his photographs.

(via imageobjecttext)

In several of his critical essays, Roberto Bolaño concludes by emphatically urging that “we must reread Borges” or “we must reread Swift”. It’s a moral argument for him: great literature is inexhaustible, and so when we reread it, we engrave its lessons on our hearts. Since we are fallible creatures, prone to distortion and forgetting, rereading helps us remember. Moreover, rereading is not repetitious because each time we reread, we are changed (or changed again). And this vigilance that he recommends, to always be learning and changing, is precisely what prevents our actual lives from becoming repetitious. As Barthes says, “those who fail to reread are obliged to read the same story everywhere”.

(via towerofsleep)


T F m
March 25, 2012

it8bit:

I’ll Be Right Here

by pacalin (photo via)


T F m
March 25, 2012

it8bit:

I’ll Be Right Here

by pacalin (photo via)


T F m
March 25, 2012