Ecozon@ Vol 8, No 2 (2017)

Journal of Literature, Culture and the Environment — Read on ecozona.eu/issue/view/124/showToc Bookmarking here so I can find it again later. This issue of the bilingual journal (Spanish and English) is dedicated to Ecocriticism and Computer- and Video- Games. It may be that “ecocriticism” is a particular critical lens. The idea of the greening of games […]

(via Crossings – YouTube) My son, @dboyfajardo, recorded my conversation with curator, Jeffrey Lambson, about the work currently on display at the Emmanuel Gallery in Denver. I share it here as a 21minute long #gpoy 😉 (Source: https://www.youtube.com/)

Strange Toys – remotedevice.net

Strange Toys – remotedevice.net Jeff Watson has written a poetic critical meditation on our current moment in time and the work of those of us who make toys and other entertainments. Worth your time.

Constricting knowledge: ‘More rigour’, tone policing and white feminism in game studies

mahlibombing: I presented three papers at the most recent DiGRA conference in Dundee. I’m an honours student (in Australia it’s an additional year on top of an undergraduate degree, which can work in lieu of a Masters so as to go straight into a PhD program) and this was my first international conference. Before DiGRA, […]

Killing Me Softly

Killing Me Softly on my to-play list, grateful this game exists

There are no enemies in the game and nobody is killed, and yet since its launch in April 2014 Monument Valley has sold 5 million copies and generated $13 million in revenue by attracting a broad base of fans beyond hardcore and experienced gamers including kids, old people, families, and newcomers. (via Secrets behind the […]

To “consume” a game, it is no longer necessary to play it. Rather, the most important thing about a game is that it exists, because that means you can think about it. (Or maybe, games don’t even have to exist? Consider the endless press previews and unreleased games that engross so many people. These are […]

To “consume” a game, it is no longer necessary to play it. Rather, the most important thing about a game is that it exists, because that means you can think about it. (Or maybe, games don’t even have to exist? Consider the endless press previews and unreleased games that engross so many people. These are […]

Cross-Cultural Understanding Through Game Analysis

Cross-Cultural Understanding Through Game Analysis Author, Brian Upton, proposes a deep structure that affords games to travel/translate. The notion of a deep structure echoes for me the linguistic concept of Chomsky’s that attempts to reason why humans have language. The structure, in Chomsky’s version, is in the brains of all humans. I haven’t yet read […]