When Columbus appeared in the Caribbean, the descendants of the world’s two Neolithic civilizations collided, with overwhelming consequences for both. American Neolithic development occurred later than that of the Middle East, possibly because the Indians needed more time to build up the requisite population density. Without beasts of burden they could not capitalize on the wheel (for individual workers on uneven terrain skids are nearly as effective as carts for hauling), and they never developed steel. But in agriculture they handily outstripped the children of Sumeria. Every tomato in Italy, every potato in Ireland, and every hot pepper in Thailand came from this hemisphere. Worldwide, more than half the crops grown today were initially developed in the Americas.

Charles C. Mann in The Atlantic. 1491
Before it became the New World, the Western Hemisphere was vastly more populous and sophisticated than has been thought—an altogether more salubrious place to live at the time than, say, Europe. New evidence of both the extent of the population and its agricultural advancement leads to a remarkable conjecture: the Amazon rain forest may be largely a human artifact

1491

(via protoslacker)


T F m
July 31, 2016

ferestecdiary:

jigglypuff (en San Lorenzo de El Escorial, Madrid)


T F m
July 31, 2016

daveortega:

Gearing up for @latinocomicsexpo #zines #latino #comics #juarez #revolucionmexicana


T F m
July 31, 2016

stoweboyd:

Open Source Design 02: WikiLeaks Guide/Critical Infrastructure 

Mapping the discontinuous spatiality of the contemporary nation-state through the publication of the secret government memo listing 259 facilities around the world considered crucial to everyday life in the US.

Architecture / Geoff Manaugh


T F m
July 31, 2016

Gathering my tag cloud poems written since 2009 for a chapbook/artistBook. #HighGroundDesignConversation (at Bindery on Blake)


T F m
July 29, 2016

#IneedDiverseGames earns me strange looks through Union Station (at Rtd Light Rail – Union Station)


T F m
July 27, 2016

How and why we built an internet connected solar panel

How and why we built an internet connected solar panel


T F m
July 27, 2016


T F m
July 26, 2016

prostheticknowledge:

GENERATIVE LOGO SYNTHESIZER

Graphic Design project by @patrikhuebner generates random logos for fictional brands:

Creating a visual identity is one of the most intricate and
challenging tasks a designer can face and it is one of those very
special realms that uniquely blur the lines between art and design.
Aiding and promoting instant public recognition of a brand is a both
timeless and singularly contemporary task that has a long standing
history of innovation and disruption.

Following in the footsteps of that spirit, this generative logo
synthesizer is the result of an experiment that tries to deconstruct the
components of a logo into separate, semi-autonomous blocks of
computer-code that can be infinitely reassembled using a simple but
powerful “decision-making“-algorithm. And while that algorithm has some
very basic underlying principles it adheres to, it can freely “design“
logos to its heart’s content – expressing an almost infinite amount of
shapes and identities in the process.

You can see more for yourself here

You can see more of Patrik’s work at his Tumblr blog here


T F m
July 26, 2016

The Architect Who Became a Diamond

The Architect Who Became a Diamond


T F m
July 26, 2016