visicert:

Cliff Retreat Section | Alex Hogrefe


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April 29, 2016

hitrecordjoe:

“yet another storm in a teacup”


T F m
April 29, 2016

theparisreview:

“Paint to End Painting”: A Look at Brice Marden’s Notebooks


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April 29, 2016

Not only that, but efforts to make women change simply aren’t solving tech’s gender problem: instead, it’s getting worse. Women still make up only 25% of tech roles, with women of color particularly underrepresented: the computing workforce is just 3% Black women, 5% Asian women, and 1% Latina women. All lean in means is that women are expected to do even more to “prove” they belong in tech: dedicate more time, change who they are and how they communicate, spend more money. All these efforts, situations, and investments stem (pun intended) from one obvious, but oft unstated supposition: tech culture can’t (or shouldn’t) be changed and women need to adjust themselves to fit within the system.


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April 29, 2016

““The easy problems have been solved. Designing systems is difficult because there is no consensus on what the problems are, let alone how to solve them,” wrote Mary Poppendieck, the lean-software development guru, in 2002.”

Strategy as a Wicked Problem
https://hbr.org/2008/05/strategy-as-a-wicked-problem
via Instapaper

(via iamdanw)

T F m
April 29, 2016

Jerry Saltz: Every artist makes rules — I’ll only use rulers, or I won’t use the camera. One of your rules, unconsciously or consciously, was “I’m not going to be an actor, a star, in these videos”?

James Franco: Yes, early on. Because I had this feeling like, Oh, I should keep these worlds separate. The same thing when I wrote my book. I thought, Oh, I don’t dare write about the movie industry or anything like that. James Franco, artist, is different from James Franco, actor. Then I realized there’s no way, so I’ll try to harness that and use that content as material.

Can the Art World Take James Franco Seriously? – Vulture

art as games, artists as creators of rule-based processes and systems


T F m
April 28, 2016

In terms of structure, having been part of Slack groups ranging in size from 2 to 2,000 people, I have learned that Slack only really works at the team level of 2–25 people (give or take). It is possible to derive value from larger channels, for example as activity streams mostly for notifications, but not as conversational or collaborative spaces.

The chat overload is just beginning — Work Futures

Agreed. Global Game Jam’s Slack channels were frustrating. IRC felt better. Basecamp was not bad. Collaboration at scale across all time zones on the palnet, both synchronously and asynchronously, is a significant challenge.


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April 28, 2016

celia-hannes:

Ettore Sottsass, Photograph, India, 1987 


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April 28, 2016


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April 28, 2016

What can we learn from artists about living a creative life?

Lin Manuel Miranda: One of my favorite books is My Name Is Asher Lev by Chaim Potok. It’s about a young boy and his maturation into an artist. His mom always wanted him to paint pretty pictures, paint beautiful pictures. She asked, Did you paint something beautiful? And one of the great lines in the book is, No, I don’t paint pretty pictures; they’re good but they’re not pretty. It’s about honesty. Real artists show us the world in a way we recognize as our own. It’s not necessarily what we always want to hear, but it might be what we need to hear. Artists can do that in a way nothing else really can.


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April 28, 2016