5centsapound:

Nadia Myre, Indian Act

Indian Act speaks of the realities of colonization – the effects of contact, and its often-broken and untranslated contracts. The piece consists of all 56 pages of the Canadian Federal Government’s Indian Act mounted on stroud cloth and sewn over with red and white glass beads. Each word is replaced with white beads sewn into the document; the red beads replace the negative space.


T F m
March 26, 2016

5centsapound:

Nadia Myre, Indian Act

Indian Act speaks of the realities of colonization – the effects of contact, and its often-broken and untranslated contracts. The piece consists of all 56 pages of the Canadian Federal Government’s Indian Act mounted on stroud cloth and sewn over with red and white glass beads. Each word is replaced with white beads sewn into the document; the red beads replace the negative space.


T F m
March 26, 2016

npr:

Comic books from several discrete decades get mashed up in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, while swaths of real estate — uninhabited swaths, we’re repeatedly assured — just get pulped. But no text is quoted more directly than The Dark Knight Returns, Frank Miller’s influential 1986 tale of an over-the-hill Batman coming out of retirement to clean up a Gotham gone to hell. It was the greatest Batman story ever told, and it had the unforeseen side effect of draining every particle of sunlight out of superhero stories for years to come. But it hit far beyond the normal comics readership, foretelling our current era of superheroes as mainstream entertainment for grownups, and it helped publisher DC Comics briefly eclipse its chief rival, Marvel.

‘Batman V Superman’: Superheroes Adrift In A Grim Sea Of Studio Money

Photo: Clay Enos/Courtesy of Warner Brothers


T F m
March 26, 2016

npr:

Comic books from several discrete decades get mashed up in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, while swaths of real estate — uninhabited swaths, we’re repeatedly assured — just get pulped. But no text is quoted more directly than The Dark Knight Returns, Frank Miller’s influential 1986 tale of an over-the-hill Batman coming out of retirement to clean up a Gotham gone to hell. It was the greatest Batman story ever told, and it had the unforeseen side effect of draining every particle of sunlight out of superhero stories for years to come. But it hit far beyond the normal comics readership, foretelling our current era of superheroes as mainstream entertainment for grownups, and it helped publisher DC Comics briefly eclipse its chief rival, Marvel.

‘Batman V Superman’: Superheroes Adrift In A Grim Sea Of Studio Money

Photo: Clay Enos/Courtesy of Warner Brothers


T F m
March 26, 2016

npr:

wnyc:

New York City Sanitation Department worker Nelson Molina has been finding and organizing discarded gems for 30 years. He calls his collection Treasures in the Trash. That, and other great things the internet gave us this week:

http://www.wnyc.org/story/sideshow-chorus-line-rihanna-rip-phife-dawg/
(via Studio 360)

Expert Furby curation. -Emily


T F m
March 26, 2016

I am going to be rather hard-nosed and say that if you have to find devices to coax yourself to stay focused on writing, perhaps you should not be writing what you’re writing. And if this lack of motivation is a constant problem, perhaps writing is not your forte. I mean, what is the problem? If writing bores you, that is pretty fatal. If that is not the case, but you find that it is hard going and it just doesn’t flow, well, what did you expect? It is work; art is work.

URSULA LeGUIN

advicetowriters.com

(via kadrey)


T F m
March 26, 2016

I am going to be rather hard-nosed and say that if you have to find devices to coax yourself to stay focused on writing, perhaps you should not be writing what you’re writing. And if this lack of motivation is a constant problem, perhaps writing is not your forte. I mean, what is the problem? If writing bores you, that is pretty fatal. If that is not the case, but you find that it is hard going and it just doesn’t flow, well, what did you expect? It is work; art is work.

URSULA LeGUIN

advicetowriters.com

(via kadrey)


T F m
March 26, 2016

superheroesincolor:

Super Black: American Pop Culture and Black Superheroes 

by Adilifu Nama

“Super Black places the appearance of black superheroes alongside broad and sweeping cultural trends in American politics and pop culture, which reveals how black superheroes are not disposable pop products, but rather a fascinating racial phenomenon through which futuristic expressions and fantastic visions of black racial identity and symbolic political meaning are presented. 

Adilifu Nama sees the value–and finds new avenues for exploring racial identity–in black superheroes who are often dismissed as sidekicks, imitators of established white heroes, or are accused of having no role outside of blaxploitation film contexts. 

Super Black explores how black superheroes are a powerful source of racial meaning, narrative, and imagination in American society that express a myriad of racial assumptions, political perspectives, and fantastic (re)imaginings of black identity. The book also demonstrates how these figures overtly represent or implicitly signify social discourse and accepted wisdom concerning notions of racial reciprocity, equality, forgiveness, and ultimately, racial justice.”

Get it now here

Adilifu Nama is an Associate Professor at California State University Northridge. He is the author of the award-winning Black Space: Imagining Race in Science Fiction Film, the first book length examination of the topic. Throughout his books, various articles, and presentations, Nama has explored how race and media intersect in television, film, and hip-hop music with a critical eye toward contextualizing black representation along with black racial formation.


[ Follow SuperheroesInColor on facebook / twitter / tumblr ]


T F m
March 26, 2016

superheroesincolor:

Super Black: American Pop Culture and Black Superheroes 

by Adilifu Nama

“Super Black places the appearance of black superheroes alongside broad and sweeping cultural trends in American politics and pop culture, which reveals how black superheroes are not disposable pop products, but rather a fascinating racial phenomenon through which futuristic expressions and fantastic visions of black racial identity and symbolic political meaning are presented. 

Adilifu Nama sees the value–and finds new avenues for exploring racial identity–in black superheroes who are often dismissed as sidekicks, imitators of established white heroes, or are accused of having no role outside of blaxploitation film contexts. 

Super Black explores how black superheroes are a powerful source of racial meaning, narrative, and imagination in American society that express a myriad of racial assumptions, political perspectives, and fantastic (re)imaginings of black identity. The book also demonstrates how these figures overtly represent or implicitly signify social discourse and accepted wisdom concerning notions of racial reciprocity, equality, forgiveness, and ultimately, racial justice.”

Get it now here

Adilifu Nama is an Associate Professor at California State University Northridge. He is the author of the award-winning Black Space: Imagining Race in Science Fiction Film, the first book length examination of the topic. Throughout his books, various articles, and presentations, Nama has explored how race and media intersect in television, film, and hip-hop music with a critical eye toward contextualizing black representation along with black racial formation.


[ Follow SuperheroesInColor on facebook / twitter / tumblr ]


T F m
March 26, 2016

What you think about Millennials says a lot about you, nothing about them

mostlysignssomeportents:

Adam “Ruins Everything” Conover was asked to give a keynote to a conference on marketing to millennials, and he brought the house down with an amazing speech about the absurdity of generalizations about generations, and about how all of the generalizations hurled at millennials have been slimed over every other generation, too.

Moreover, all the things that people say about millennials’ relationship to social media have been said about other media.

Remember: in 1790, novels had “poisoned the mind and corrupted the morals of many a promising youth; and prevented others from improving their minds in useful knowledge.”

Remember: in 1816, the waltz was “obscene display” only fit for “prostitutes and adulteresses” and it was “a duty to warn every parent against exposing his daughter to so fatal a contagion.”

Remember: in 1909, movies were a way for “depraved adults with candies and pennies beguile children with the inevitable result.”

Remember: in 1926, the telephone was a scourge whose effect was to “break up home life and the old practice of visiting friends.”

Remember, in 1954, “All child drug addicts, and all children drawn into the narcotics traffic as messengers, with whom we have had contact, were inveterate comic-book readers.”

Remember: in 1956, “The effect of rock and roll on young people, is to turn them into devil worshippers; to stimulate self-expression through sex; to provoke lawlessness; impair nervous stability and destroy the sanctity of marriage.”

Remember, in 2005, Hillary Clinton said that video games were “stealing the innocence of our children” and “making the difficult job of being a parent even harder.”

http://boingboing.net/2016/03/26/what-you-think-about-millennia.html

“get off my lawn!”

“I would have gotten away with it of not for you meddling kids!”

“don’t let them generation gap you…”


T F m
March 26, 2016