companies and organizations want marginalized creators to contribute to their events, but with little to no compensation for the work. The most egregious offender of this GDC, which is for-profit yet has the most extensive process for extracting labor for talks given for one of their passes, which gets most of its value from the talks being outsourced for free. This is the case for all speakers, but especially so for the diversity track, which depends on creators who have to self-fund in order to attend the event, which is itself expensive being downtown in San Francisco. Being at the center of the video game industry, many events and organizations follow the same model, where asking for compensation for contributing to a games event is most typically out of the question. Like GDC, Intel is using people who are, as a result of being marginalized, poorer to act as their move for redemption, to look good rather than be good.

Diversity of Existence | Mattie Brice

Mattie Brice riffing on Veve Jaffa and testifying from her own experience. That last phrase.


T F m
November 30, 2015

companies and organizations want marginalized creators to contribute to their events, but with little to no compensation for the work. The most egregious offender of this GDC, which is for-profit yet has the most extensive process for extracting labor for talks given for one of their passes, which gets most of its value from the talks being outsourced for free. This is the case for all speakers, but especially so for the diversity track, which depends on creators who have to self-fund in order to attend the event, which is itself expensive being downtown in San Francisco. Being at the center of the video game industry, many events and organizations follow the same model, where asking for compensation for contributing to a games event is most typically out of the question. Like GDC, Intel is using people who are, as a result of being marginalized, poorer to act as their move for redemption, to look good rather than be good.

Diversity of Existence | Mattie Brice

Mattie Brice riffing on Veve Jaffa and testifying from her own experience. That last phrase.


T F m
November 30, 2015

Clone Spotting: How Counterfeits Hurt the Open Source Movement | Make:

Clone Spotting: How Counterfeits Hurt the Open Source Movement | Make:


T F m
November 28, 2015

stilleatingoranges:

Critics panned it. A pedestrian cable drama sneered at it. Worse, its creator disowned it–loudly. And none of the foregoing, although ominous, is indicative of its quality. The film is Mr. Magorium’s Wonder Emporium, a children’s picture unfairly reviled in 2007 and forgotten afterward. Between slick credits sequences animated by William Joyce, it weaves a (relaxed, meandering) tale that is principally about death. A 243-year-old man, who runs a living toy store with a 23-year-old woman, is dying; and he hires a lukewarm accountant to review his estate. An eccentric young boy with a taste for hats stars also. Surprisingly, one finds here neither Hallmark schmaltz nor Charlie and the Chocolate Factory cynicism and spectacle, but something alien to both.

Weighty for any current artist is the problem of kitsch–or, in honor of the style’s grandmaster, the problem of Thomas Kinkade. Today, a faint (for some, invisible) line separates the hard-fought tenderness of Disney’s Sleeping Beauty from a vomitous Kinkade canvas. Innocence risks a fall into phony romanticism. The artist must embrace this challenge, however. In 1990, writer David Foster Wallace predicted that “anti-rebels”, a nonjaded movement opposed to the ironic distance of postmodernism, would revitalize art amid “accusations of sentimentality, melodrama.” Ironic art, for Wallace, was a dead end: ultimately it is a safeguard against all feeling, against life itself. There exists a third road beyond the cynical and the cloyingly naïve.

Mr. Magorium’s Wonder Emporium locates this road. It jumps with both feet into childlike whimsy–but it does not, in the process, sacrifice bite and intelligence. References are made to Fibonacci and Magritte; and King Lear’s final scene is analyzed. Robust, sophisticated acting and production design are the rule. Like that earlier project from writer-director Zach Helm, the badly underrated Stranger than Fiction (2006), this work brims with quirky humor and existential pathos. But Mr. Magorium’s Wonder Emporium was marketed as kitsch, as fodder for the family-friendly-film ghetto. An open mind with a love for good movies will see past the lie, and be pleased. The film may be obtained from the nearest bargain bin.

Still Eating Oranges


T F m
November 28, 2015

stilleatingoranges:

Critics panned it. A pedestrian cable drama sneered at it. Worse, its creator disowned it–loudly. And none of the foregoing, although ominous, is indicative of its quality. The film is Mr. Magorium’s Wonder Emporium, a children’s picture unfairly reviled in 2007 and forgotten afterward. Between slick credits sequences animated by William Joyce, it weaves a (relaxed, meandering) tale that is principally about death. A 243-year-old man, who runs a living toy store with a 23-year-old woman, is dying; and he hires a lukewarm accountant to review his estate. An eccentric young boy with a taste for hats stars also. Surprisingly, one finds here neither Hallmark schmaltz nor Charlie and the Chocolate Factory cynicism and spectacle, but something alien to both.

Weighty for any current artist is the problem of kitsch–or, in honor of the style’s grandmaster, the problem of Thomas Kinkade. Today, a faint (for some, invisible) line separates the hard-fought tenderness of Disney’s Sleeping Beauty from a vomitous Kinkade canvas. Innocence risks a fall into phony romanticism. The artist must embrace this challenge, however. In 1990, writer David Foster Wallace predicted that “anti-rebels”, a nonjaded movement opposed to the ironic distance of postmodernism, would revitalize art amid “accusations of sentimentality, melodrama.” Ironic art, for Wallace, was a dead end: ultimately it is a safeguard against all feeling, against life itself. There exists a third road beyond the cynical and the cloyingly naïve.

Mr. Magorium’s Wonder Emporium locates this road. It jumps with both feet into childlike whimsy–but it does not, in the process, sacrifice bite and intelligence. References are made to Fibonacci and Magritte; and King Lear’s final scene is analyzed. Robust, sophisticated acting and production design are the rule. Like that earlier project from writer-director Zach Helm, the badly underrated Stranger than Fiction (2006), this work brims with quirky humor and existential pathos. But Mr. Magorium’s Wonder Emporium was marketed as kitsch, as fodder for the family-friendly-film ghetto. An open mind with a love for good movies will see past the lie, and be pleased. The film may be obtained from the nearest bargain bin.

Still Eating Oranges


T F m
November 28, 2015

mfortki:

ENgendering Gender Changers 
Connections for Disconnections from Queer Technology 

ENgenderingGenderChangers is a “solution” to Gender Adaptersʼ male/female binary, offering a wider array of gender adapters for the ever increasing complexity and demands of the Information Technology workforce. By expanding serial adapters beyond male and female configurations, ENgenderingGenderChangers allow for new and unforeseen serial connections to deliver higher profit, powerful flexibility, and robust performance.

For example, the Female DB25 to Power Bottom DB25 is for the hardware risk-taker. This ENgenderingGenderChanger connects to a male serial cable. Its hollow and seemingly ineffective interior merges with a connected flow of power and takes control of the signal, redirecting current based on pin configuration. Perfect for surreptitious data manipulation, the Power Bottom gender changer utilizes a pacified design to undermine traditional hardware control structures.


T F m
November 28, 2015

mfortki:

ENgendering Gender Changers 
Connections for Disconnections from Queer Technology 

ENgenderingGenderChangers is a “solution” to Gender Adaptersʼ male/female binary, offering a wider array of gender adapters for the ever increasing complexity and demands of the Information Technology workforce. By expanding serial adapters beyond male and female configurations, ENgenderingGenderChangers allow for new and unforeseen serial connections to deliver higher profit, powerful flexibility, and robust performance.

For example, the Female DB25 to Power Bottom DB25 is for the hardware risk-taker. This ENgenderingGenderChanger connects to a male serial cable. Its hollow and seemingly ineffective interior merges with a connected flow of power and takes control of the signal, redirecting current based on pin configuration. Perfect for surreptitious data manipulation, the Power Bottom gender changer utilizes a pacified design to undermine traditional hardware control structures.


T F m
November 28, 2015

Quest for coffee continues (at Four Barrel Coffee)


T F m
November 27, 2015

Quest for coffee continues (at Four Barrel Coffee)


T F m
November 27, 2015

Chris Ware mural on facade of Pirate Supply (at 826 Valencia)


T F m
November 27, 2015