touof:

Georges Perec – Species of Spaces and Other Pieces, 1974


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June 26, 2015

claytoncubitt:

One Thursday in 1982, Jean-Michel tells Suzanne to stand up and walk, they are going to the MoMA. He tells Suzanne to wear his clothes. She ties his pants around her waist with a rope. His sweater hangs down to her knees.

At the museum Jean-Michel takes a bottle of water out of his coat and walks through the halls sprinkling the water here and there around him. “I’d piss like a dog if I could,” he says, as they wander past paintings by Pollock, Picasso, Kline and Braque. Suzanne does not even ask what he is doing. She knows this is one of his voodoo tricks.

“There are no black men in museums,” he says. “Try counting…” Suzanne cannot find even one.

“This is another white man’s cotton plantation,” he explains.

When they get back home Jean-Michel puts on a Charlie Parker tape and tells Suzanne to be very quiet.

It begins to rain outside, a slow, dark rain that will not stop for three days. –Jennifer Clement, Widow Basquiat

(via Clayton Cubitt on Instagram http://ift.tt/1LGyuOj)


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June 26, 2015

Works of art can fail so easily, it is so difficult for them to succeed. One man will fall silent because of his lack of feeling; another, because his emotion chokes him. A third frees himself, not from the burden that weighs on him, but only from a feeling of unfreedom. A forth breaks his tools because they have too long been used to exploit him. The world is not obliged to be sentimental. Defeats should be acknowledged; but one should not conclude from them that there should be no more struggles.

Bertolt Brecht, from  Against Georg Lukacs. (via otterdactyl)

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June 26, 2015

gallowhill:

The Bandaged Orchestra during the Fluxus festival, arranged by Yoko Ono at Carnegie Recital Hall in 1965.


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June 26, 2015

In much the same way that PBS exists to make room for television shows that deserve to be seen but likely couldn’t help sell hamburgers or laundry detergent, there should be an arts fund – not a Patreon, not a Kickstarter, a legit fund – for video game creation. Some exist, here and there – in fact such a fund was how Tale of Tales managed to subsist this long – but they’re not large enough to really, truly foster this kind of creative experimentation.


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June 26, 2015

Mark Rothko, No 7, 1964

Ed note: This new-to-me, larger scan is less blue than the previous version which appears more blue center and brown outside, while this appears more neutral and purple but I suspect it’s more true as the other scans of no 7 I have seen resemble it more, and “pushing” Rothkos for color is a tumblr epidemic.


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June 26, 2015

America’s greatest shame in 2015 is not a piece of cloth. It’s that a black boy has a life expectancy five years shorter than a white boy. It’s that the net worth of the average black household in 2011 was $6,314, compared with $110,500 for the average white household, according to census data. It’s that almost two-thirds of black children grow up in low-income families. It’s that more than one-third of inner-city black kids suffer lead poisoning (and thus often lifelong brain impairment), mostly from old lead paint in substandard housing.


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June 26, 2015

I open up the box in Vanitas every time I’m about to step off the train, because I need a reminder that every moment is magical, every object has something to say to me.


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June 26, 2015

Just because a game decided it’s a woman shooting a dude in the face doesn’t change why I feel disconnected from this medium.


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June 26, 2015

iandeleonarts:

latinocaribbeanartists:

Ian Deleón

¡Este Pueblo Tiene Sabor!, 2013. Inkjet print, 21 x 21 in (53 x 53 cm).

These figurative logos for Hatuey beer (purchased by Bacardi from the original Cuban bottlers) and the Old Colony soft drink (marketed in Puerto Rico through Pepsi) are taken out of their consumer product contexts and placed against the sky blue background of Puerto Rico’s original flag (modern versions of the flag exhibit a darkening shade of blue depending on the island’s political proximity to the U.S.). The Taíno cacique Hatuey (claimed by Cuba as its first national hero for his uprising against the Spanish) is seen here defiantly standing at a very close distance to this faceless symbol of colonial domination. This digital provocation is an attempt to reclaim the visual power of these problematic corporate narratives–enacting a revenge fantasy in which history may be altered, and the Taínos are not overpowered by the colonizing force.

“These People Have Flavor” is the artist’s translation of the absurdly lighthearted tagline (“¡Este Pueblo Tiene Sabor!”) used to promote the Old Colony soft drink in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico—a slap in the face that Hatuey will hopefully return.

[x]

¡¡¡ wooo, gracias latinocaribbeanartists ^-^ !!!


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June 26, 2015