chaosophia218:

The Flower of Life is the modern name given to a geometrical figure composed of multiple evenly-spaced, overlapping circles. They are arranged to form a flower-like pattern with a sixfold symmetry.

Within the Flower Of Life’s concentric circle pattern lies another pattern – the The Fruit of Life. This symbol is composed of 13 circles taken from the design of the Flower of Life. The Fruit of Life is said to be the blueprint of the Universe, containing the basis for the design for atoms, molecular structures, life forms, in short everything in existence.


T F m
March 31, 2015

femfreq:

The first episode of our mini-series focusing on Positive Female Characters in video games will premiere this week! 


T F m
March 31, 2015

designfictions:

Exercising our green thumbs!

Top 4 images taken yesterday at our 2015 Green Screen (Chroma Key) workshop… In preparation for the production of their Design Fiction video prototypes.

Bottom 3 images of a 2014 student group making their DesFi video prototype (for the Brisbane Airport) using green screening techniques. See their final video here: http://designfictions.tumblr.com/post/87560454080/eq-wall-video-prototype-using-green-screening

And a 2013 group project (for the Brisbane Airport) http://designfictions.tumblr.com/post/52206781226/terrific-results-on-the-airport-of-the-future

And another from a student of the 2012 cohort (for the Cube Installation): http://designfictions.tumblr.com/post/24095327255/catjoise-prototype-the-laugh-park-josie see Josie’s project tumblr here: http://catjoise.tumblr.com

Some fun examples of green screen used in film production:


T F m
March 31, 2015

The Early Disruptors: 7 Masterpieces of ‘90s Net Art Everyone Should Know About


T F m
March 31, 2015

We need to sit on the rim
of the well of darkness
and fish for fallen light
with patience.

Pablo Neruda, The Sea and the Bells (via whyallcaps)

T F m
March 30, 2015

so-books:

Donald Judd Complete Writings 1959-1975


T F m
March 30, 2015

archiemcphee:

These whimsical wooden automata are the creations of contemporary Japanese woodworker Kazuaki Harada. We’re particularly fond of the dancing ham and veggies. After first spending a year studying under English master automata-maker Matt Smith, Harada began crafting his own automatons in 2002. His playful pieces vary in both size and complexity, but all are operated by the turning of a single handle and are created in the spirit of simply delighting people. Why else would you create an automaton wearing nothing but socks, with the ability to boil a pot of tea on his own belly?

Visit Kazuaki Harada’s YouTube channel to check out many more of his marvelous wooden automatons in action. You can also follow him on Instagram and check out pieces he has for sale via his online shop.

[via Spoon & Tamago]


T F m
March 30, 2015

Survey: The State of Adjunct Professors

Survey: The State of Adjunct Professors


T F m
March 30, 2015

For years, I opened my 11th-grade U.S. history classes by asking students, “What’s the name of that guy they say discovered America?” A few students might object to the word “discover,” but they all knew the fellow I was talking about. “Christopher Columbus!” several called out in unison.

“Right. So who did he find when he came here?” I asked. Usually, a few students would say, “Indians,” but I asked them to be specific: “Which nationality? What are their names?”

Silence.

In more than 30 years of teaching U.S. history and guest-teaching in others’ classes, I’ve never had a single student say, “Taínos.” So I ask them to think about that fact. “How do we explain that? We all know the name of the man who came here from Europe, but none of us knows the name of the people who were here first—and there were hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of them. Why haven’t you heard of them?”

This ignorance is an artifact of historical silencing—rendering invisible the lives and stories of entire peoples.


T F m
March 29, 2015

Stunning board-game history book

mostlysignssomeportents:

The Games We Played: The Golden Age of Board and Table
Games,
“ is a stunningly illustrated book from an academic press, collecting board and token-art from a museum collection of
boardgames. 


T F m
March 29, 2015