I’ve decided that I won’t be organizing a node of @globalgamejam at @uofdenver this year. I hope that another member of the faculty, or a student group, picks up where I am leaving off.


T F m
October 28, 2014

I’ve decided that I won’t be organizing a node of @globalgamejam at @uofdenver this year. I hope that another member of the faculty, or a student group, picks up where I am leaving off.


T F m
October 28, 2014

bellgrami:

behind-a-wall-of-illusion:

c2ndy2c1d:

otakusiren:

PLEASE GO WATCH THE BOOK OF LIFE! 

SERIOUSLY. RIGHT NOW, DROP EVERYTHING AND MAKE PLANS WITH BIG GROUPS TO GO WATCH THIS AMAZING MOVIE! 

I JUST SAW THIS TODAY AND IT IS ONE OF THE GREATEST FILMS I’VE SEEN IN A VERY LONG TIME!

I AM NOT JOKING, THIS DESERVES ALL THE LOVE TUMBLR HAS TO OFFER! 

$50 MILLION DOLLARS WAS SPENT TO MAKE THIS BEAUTIFUL MASTERPIECE AND YOU SHOULD SHOW IT SOME RESPECT! 

BEAUTIFUL VISUALS, BEAUTIFUL MESSAGE, BEAUTIFUL CHARACTERS, AND BEAUTIFUL CULTURE REPRESENTATION THAT I’VE SEEN IN AN ANIMATED MOVIE! 

GO WATCH THIS MOVIE NOW! THIS IS AN OFFICIAL PSA! 

are you fucking kidding me???? they only made 2/5 back?

come on tumblr, i thought we we’re all here to represent POC in more films   

LISTEN THE HELL UP EVERYONE:

THIS IS PLANNED TO BE A TRILOGY

Yeah, you heard me! The Book of Life is Monolo’s Story, the sequel is going to be Joaquin’s story, and the third is to be Maria’s story. They want to make a gorgeous animated movie starring a Latina character

that is NOT going to happen unless this movie brings in some serious bucks

As of October 26th, this movie has made almost only 30 million

I know I’ve been insistant on How Train Your Dragon 2, but I am a million times more agressive about this movie

The Book of Life took 5 YEARS TO MAKE. Jorge R. Gutierrez has been wanting to make this movie for 14 YEARS but was said no countless times until finally a small studio gave this project a chance

this is honestly the most work, love, soul, dedication and passion i have ever seen go into a movie, animated or not. I cried during the film, and I cried hearing the people who worked on this project talk about it and and all it represents and what hope it brings and there’s just too much that’s amazing about it that i can’t even fit it all here

go see this movie. if you already have, see it again. tell EVERYONE you know to go see it. please for the love of god

this is our one chance to make movies made by and starring poc successful, to show that kids movies that have layers upon layers of meaning and that don’t talk down to its audience be successful

i’m honestly crying and shaking right now because I am terrified that this movie is not gonna make even it’s own production costs back and that the 14 year struggle to get this on screen will be for nothing

please go see this movie??? it literally made me cry to finally see the culture i grew up with, my culture, so beautifully represented on this medium. this movie is of the highest quality and everyone needs to go see it


T F m
October 27, 2014

bellgrami:

behind-a-wall-of-illusion:

c2ndy2c1d:

otakusiren:

PLEASE GO WATCH THE BOOK OF LIFE! 

SERIOUSLY. RIGHT NOW, DROP EVERYTHING AND MAKE PLANS WITH BIG GROUPS TO GO WATCH THIS AMAZING MOVIE! 

I JUST SAW THIS TODAY AND IT IS ONE OF THE GREATEST FILMS I’VE SEEN IN A VERY LONG TIME!

I AM NOT JOKING, THIS DESERVES ALL THE LOVE TUMBLR HAS TO OFFER! 

$50 MILLION DOLLARS WAS SPENT TO MAKE THIS BEAUTIFUL MASTERPIECE AND YOU SHOULD SHOW IT SOME RESPECT! 

BEAUTIFUL VISUALS, BEAUTIFUL MESSAGE, BEAUTIFUL CHARACTERS, AND BEAUTIFUL CULTURE REPRESENTATION THAT I’VE SEEN IN AN ANIMATED MOVIE! 

GO WATCH THIS MOVIE NOW! THIS IS AN OFFICIAL PSA! 

are you fucking kidding me???? they only made 2/5 back?

come on tumblr, i thought we we’re all here to represent POC in more films   

LISTEN THE HELL UP EVERYONE:

THIS IS PLANNED TO BE A TRILOGY

Yeah, you heard me! The Book of Life is Monolo’s Story, the sequel is going to be Joaquin’s story, and the third is to be Maria’s story. They want to make a gorgeous animated movie starring a Latina character

that is NOT going to happen unless this movie brings in some serious bucks

As of October 26th, this movie has made almost only 30 million

I know I’ve been insistant on How Train Your Dragon 2, but I am a million times more agressive about this movie

The Book of Life took 5 YEARS TO MAKE. Jorge R. Gutierrez has been wanting to make this movie for 14 YEARS but was said no countless times until finally a small studio gave this project a chance

this is honestly the most work, love, soul, dedication and passion i have ever seen go into a movie, animated or not. I cried during the film, and I cried hearing the people who worked on this project talk about it and and all it represents and what hope it brings and there’s just too much that’s amazing about it that i can’t even fit it all here

go see this movie. if you already have, see it again. tell EVERYONE you know to go see it. please for the love of god

this is our one chance to make movies made by and starring poc successful, to show that kids movies that have layers upon layers of meaning and that don’t talk down to its audience be successful

i’m honestly crying and shaking right now because I am terrified that this movie is not gonna make even it’s own production costs back and that the 14 year struggle to get this on screen will be for nothing

please go see this movie??? it literally made me cry to finally see the culture i grew up with, my culture, so beautifully represented on this medium. this movie is of the highest quality and everyone needs to go see it


T F m
October 27, 2014

No longer a teacher.

hongkongteacher:

Years ago in a class on equity and education, Dr. Jeff Duncan-Andrade told us students that if we dared to practice a critical or transformative pedagogy, that we should prepare to be fired at some point in our careers. Dr. Duncan-Andrade was one of the best secondary teachers (and professors) I had ever met, but he had been previously fired from a job despite having been awarded as a “teacher of the year”.

So with this advice firmly planted in my head over the years, it was a bit of shock, but no surprise, that I was fired from my job as an English and Humanities teacher on Friday. 

Over the last three years in that position, I pushed for teaching that would meaningfully engage all my students of ethnic minority backgrounds and push them to higher levels of academic attainment. I am extremely proud of the work we accomplished and the ways in which students grew as readers, writers, thinkers, communicators, and community members.

However, that push led to conflict and frustration. Clearly my vision for meeting the needs of students did not match the school’s own vision, or lack of vision. Over the years, I consistently enquired about what the vision was for meeting the academic, emotional, and social needs of students from ethnic minority backgrounds at our school. Yet never once was I engaged in such a conversation.

I could see by the end of the last academic year that I was not going to be part of building a program for students at the school. With that in mind, I sought new employment, and was presented with several offers and opportunities. I had always prided myself on a sense of professionalism guided by diplomacy and collaboration, so I knew I needed to work somewhere that would again nurture those values in me.

I was resolved to take my career to a school with shared vision, where my talents would be appreciated and developed, so I was startled to receive an offer from the school for full-time employment for the following year. I refused any offer at first, but the school was persistent, and obviously worried about the enrollment for the following year. Without the minimum number of students in form one, the school could face closure. At that point, there had been three years of lack of cooperation to develop a program for students, so I was skeptical about the school’s intentions in offering me a new position. If I had been so much trouble, why would they want me back?

So on Friday, less than two months into the new year, with the fourth principal at the head of the school in the three years I spent at the school, I was informed that my contract was terminated because there could be no cooperation between myself and the school. 

My mother has always taught me to be positive and the see possibility in any setback. Now, I am deeply saddened at the loss of my students. I am going to greatly miss seeing their faces in the morning: their smiles, their scowls, their distressed looks, and their mischievous grins. I’m going to miss seeing their joy in picking up a new book or making the class crack up with their writing. But I know there is something greater beyond now.

A school faces many constraints, and within those constraints, a critical/transformative pedagogy is increasingly difficult. My goal now has to be to create a space for like-minded educators, families, and students to build the learning community they deserve. This is real life, not a movie. Virus does not give the pen to Rancho. If we want a different kind of education, we have to build it.

In the meantime, I want all of my students to work hard. Get the most you can out of each subject, each lesson. Keep taking advantage of opportunities presented to you. Respect your teachers and your school. Your community at your school goes on beyond me.

I wish we were not facing this discontinuity. I wanted to be alongside you all for much longer. But we face a sudden and unexpected change. The time to be resilient is now.

I will now focus on finally finishing my dissertation over the next couple months. Yes, soon I will be Dr. C. Then, I will figure out how I can continue to work with some of you in some other capacity. We have built our social capital over the last three years, and there are many people willing to help. 

Thanks to all my friends, colleagues, students, and family who continue to support me. I love all of you.


T F m
October 26, 2014

No longer a teacher.

hongkongteacher:

Years ago in a class on equity and education, Dr. Jeff Duncan-Andrade told us students that if we dared to practice a critical or transformative pedagogy, that we should prepare to be fired at some point in our careers. Dr. Duncan-Andrade was one of the best secondary teachers (and professors) I had ever met, but he had been previously fired from a job despite having been awarded as a “teacher of the year”.

So with this advice firmly planted in my head over the years, it was a bit of shock, but no surprise, that I was fired from my job as an English and Humanities teacher on Friday. 

Over the last three years in that position, I pushed for teaching that would meaningfully engage all my students of ethnic minority backgrounds and push them to higher levels of academic attainment. I am extremely proud of the work we accomplished and the ways in which students grew as readers, writers, thinkers, communicators, and community members.

However, that push led to conflict and frustration. Clearly my vision for meeting the needs of students did not match the school’s own vision, or lack of vision. Over the years, I consistently enquired about what the vision was for meeting the academic, emotional, and social needs of students from ethnic minority backgrounds at our school. Yet never once was I engaged in such a conversation.

I could see by the end of the last academic year that I was not going to be part of building a program for students at the school. With that in mind, I sought new employment, and was presented with several offers and opportunities. I had always prided myself on a sense of professionalism guided by diplomacy and collaboration, so I knew I needed to work somewhere that would again nurture those values in me.

I was resolved to take my career to a school with shared vision, where my talents would be appreciated and developed, so I was startled to receive an offer from the school for full-time employment for the following year. I refused any offer at first, but the school was persistent, and obviously worried about the enrollment for the following year. Without the minimum number of students in form one, the school could face closure. At that point, there had been three years of lack of cooperation to develop a program for students, so I was skeptical about the school’s intentions in offering me a new position. If I had been so much trouble, why would they want me back?

So on Friday, less than two months into the new year, with the fourth principal at the head of the school in the three years I spent at the school, I was informed that my contract was terminated because there could be no cooperation between myself and the school. 

My mother has always taught me to be positive and the see possibility in any setback. Now, I am deeply saddened at the loss of my students. I am going to greatly miss seeing their faces in the morning: their smiles, their scowls, their distressed looks, and their mischievous grins. I’m going to miss seeing their joy in picking up a new book or making the class crack up with their writing. But I know there is something greater beyond now.

A school faces many constraints, and within those constraints, a critical/transformative pedagogy is increasingly difficult. My goal now has to be to create a space for like-minded educators, families, and students to build the learning community they deserve. This is real life, not a movie. Virus does not give the pen to Rancho. If we want a different kind of education, we have to build it.

In the meantime, I want all of my students to work hard. Get the most you can out of each subject, each lesson. Keep taking advantage of opportunities presented to you. Respect your teachers and your school. Your community at your school goes on beyond me.

I wish we were not facing this discontinuity. I wanted to be alongside you all for much longer. But we face a sudden and unexpected change. The time to be resilient is now.

I will now focus on finally finishing my dissertation over the next couple months. Yes, soon I will be Dr. C. Then, I will figure out how I can continue to work with some of you in some other capacity. We have built our social capital over the last three years, and there are many people willing to help. 

Thanks to all my friends, colleagues, students, and family who continue to support me. I love all of you.


T F m
October 26, 2014

“Birdman” Never Achieves Flight

What do you risk, being a critic? This is my work, I risked everything for it. … I liked birdman. and disagree with the new yorker critic.

newyorker:

Richard Brody on the new movie starring Michael Keaton:

“ ‘Birdman’ trades on facile, casual dichotomies of theatre versus cinema and art versus commerce. It’s a white elephant of a movie that conceals a mouse of timid wisdom, a mighty and churning machine of virtuosity that delivers a work of utterly familiar and unoriginal drama. Of such things, too, can Oscar buzz can be made.”

Photograph courtesy Fox Searchlight Pictures


T F m
October 26, 2014

“Birdman” Never Achieves Flight

What do you risk, being a critic? This is my work, I risked everything for it. … I liked birdman. and disagree with the new yorker critic.

newyorker:

Richard Brody on the new movie starring Michael Keaton:

“ ‘Birdman’ trades on facile, casual dichotomies of theatre versus cinema and art versus commerce. It’s a white elephant of a movie that conceals a mouse of timid wisdom, a mighty and churning machine of virtuosity that delivers a work of utterly familiar and unoriginal drama. Of such things, too, can Oscar buzz can be made.”

Photograph courtesy Fox Searchlight Pictures


T F m
October 26, 2014

There is empowerment in sharing our voices online. There is empowerment in making our teaching public. We need to tell our stories and create the narrative of education we want, or others will do it for us. I for one would rather hear from educators, students, and parents than policy people or corp edu reformers who spend little or no time in the classroom.


T F m
October 25, 2014

There is empowerment in sharing our voices online. There is empowerment in making our teaching public. We need to tell our stories and create the narrative of education we want, or others will do it for us. I for one would rather hear from educators, students, and parents than policy people or corp edu reformers who spend little or no time in the classroom.


T F m
October 25, 2014