T F m
March 29, 2014

I’m talking with a boy. He’s at that age when the edges of the man he will become are just starting to press against his baby-round face. He’s got his first opinions and ideas and jokes, which are horrible, because there is nothing that boys his age love more than corny jokes. There is a whole industry of knock-knock-joke books for boys this age. Everything about him is gangly; his voice and his limbs fit awkwardly, like hand-me-downs. He’s young enough that his smile is easy, and he is the kind of boy who finds reasons to smile in everything: the cracking of his voice, a fire-engine siren, the fact that a grown-up is talking to him and listening to what he says. When I talk with kids like this, our conversations always seem to go the same way:

“So you’re telling me these are all the books published last year for kids?” they ask me. “That’s a lot of books. That’s more books than I could read in a year.”

There was something missing. I saw that these characters, these lives, were not mine.

“Yep, it’s a few thousand.”

“And in all of those thousands of books, I’m just not in them?”

“Well…um…yes.”

“Are there books about talking animals?”

“Oh, sure.”

“And crazy magical futures?”

“Absolutely.”

“And superpowers? And the olden days when people dressed funny? And all the combinations of those things? Like talking animals with superpowers in magical futures … but no me?”

“No you.”

“Why?”

“Because you’re brown.”


T F m
March 29, 2014

prostheticknowledge:

Sakaki Kaoro

Independent Japanese manga figurine maker uses Zbrush 3D modelling software and 3D printing to create works from scratch.

The above character is from a game entitled ‘KanColle’, yet it is fascinating to see how pieces like this are put together. Sakaki posted at the Zbrush Central Forums and uploaded several high definition shots of the work and videos demonstrating how his designs are put together using the software (in three parts, each an hour long).

You can view the thread over at Zbrush Central here, and visit Sakaki’s website (Japanese) here


T F m
March 29, 2014

prostheticknowledge:

Sakaki Kaoro

Independent Japanese manga figurine maker uses Zbrush 3D modelling software and 3D printing to create works from scratch.

The above character is from a game entitled ‘KanColle’, yet it is fascinating to see how pieces like this are put together. Sakaki posted at the Zbrush Central Forums and uploaded several high definition shots of the work and videos demonstrating how his designs are put together using the software (in three parts, each an hour long).

You can view the thread over at Zbrush Central here, and visit Sakaki’s website (Japanese) here


T F m
March 29, 2014

The many skills children develop through play, particularly the self-control practiced and refined in imaginary play, are related to long-term academic achievement.

Wendy Banning and Ginny Sullivan quoted in an article by David Sobel at Yes! Magazine. You Can’t Bounce Off the Walls If There Are No Walls: Outdoor Schools Make Kids Happier—and Smarter

Lens on Outdoor Learning

(via protoslacker)


T F m
March 29, 2014

Attempting to fully delineate all of the makerspaces emerging from the many different cultures and practices in Africa would ultimately be somewhat reductive. The tendency to reduce Africa to one entity, culture or socio-economic base is all too familiar. However, there are certain qualities in a more fractal concept of solidarity, which can be seen as a kind of multi-overlapping form of connection rather than a unity. We see many of the same implications in calls for Pan-African solidarity that are seen in the Africa Maker Faire initiative.

Ellan Foster and Ron Eglash at Think Africa Press. Generative Justice in Africa: From Fractals to the Rise of Maker Movements

Contemporary African design trends based on fractals tap into a venerable tradition of self-organisation and open new spaces for local creativity and civic participation.

(via protoslacker)


T F m
March 29, 2014

Attempting to fully delineate all of the makerspaces emerging from the many different cultures and practices in Africa would ultimately be somewhat reductive. The tendency to reduce Africa to one entity, culture or socio-economic base is all too familiar. However, there are certain qualities in a more fractal concept of solidarity, which can be seen as a kind of multi-overlapping form of connection rather than a unity. We see many of the same implications in calls for Pan-African solidarity that are seen in the Africa Maker Faire initiative.

Ellan Foster and Ron Eglash at Think Africa Press. Generative Justice in Africa: From Fractals to the Rise of Maker Movements

Contemporary African design trends based on fractals tap into a venerable tradition of self-organisation and open new spaces for local creativity and civic participation.

(via protoslacker)


T F m
March 29, 2014

fucktonofanatomyreferences:

A mouth-watering fuck-ton of hand references.

[From various sources]


T F m
March 28, 2014

Call for Abstracts: Art as Open System since the 1960s

Co-chairs: Christine Filippone and Johanna Gosse

SLSA 2014

Introduced into critical art discourse by Jack Burnham in 1968, systems theory was one of the most influential scientific theories for artists working in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Related to the fields of cybernetics, computer technology, automation and systems engineering, the concept of open systemsserved as a model for artists interested in making dynamic, fluid, and interactive art works. By definition, open systems, such as biological, ecological, or social systems, are characterized by a fluid exchange of matter, energy, and information. Open systems are associated with life, growth and change, qualities that took on special political and social resonance for artists seeking to resist the technocratic logic of Cold War America. An exemplary work of systems art, Hans Haacke’s MoMA Poll (1970), consisted of an interactive polling station where visitors were asked to respond “Yes” or “No” by paper ballot to whether Museum of Modern Art trustee and New York gubernatorial candidate Nelson Rockefeller’s support of Nixon’s policies in Vietnam would influence their decision to vote for him. The poll’s outcome was utterly contingent on visitor participation, and prompted a reconsideration of the supposedly “neutral” politics of the museum institution and of modern art in general. This panel asks about the legacy of systems theory for art since the 1960s. How might we use the concept of “open systems” to understand art works that were not explicitly responding to systems theory? What kinds of problems does art-as-open-system pose to the art institution or market? Does it retain its subversive potential? How do contemporary critical paradigms such as “relational aesthetics” or affect theory reflect the inheritance of open systems? This session examines the concept of open systems in relation to a wide range of art practices, including mail art, video art, conceptual art, computer art, Fluxus, intermedia, performance art, expanded cinema, sculpture and installation, feminist art, art and technology, land art, new media, and exhibitions. We welcome presentations by scholars, scientists, artists, and curators working on or at the intersection of art and systems.

Please submit a 1-2 page, double-spaced abstract and CV to cfilippone@millersville.edu and johannagosse@gmail.com by April 25th.


T F m
March 28, 2014

Call for Abstracts: Art as Open System since the 1960s

Co-chairs: Christine Filippone and Johanna Gosse

SLSA 2014

Introduced into critical art discourse by Jack Burnham in 1968, systems theory was one of the most influential scientific theories for artists working in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Related to the fields of cybernetics, computer technology, automation and systems engineering, the concept of open systemsserved as a model for artists interested in making dynamic, fluid, and interactive art works. By definition, open systems, such as biological, ecological, or social systems, are characterized by a fluid exchange of matter, energy, and information. Open systems are associated with life, growth and change, qualities that took on special political and social resonance for artists seeking to resist the technocratic logic of Cold War America. An exemplary work of systems art, Hans Haacke’s MoMA Poll (1970), consisted of an interactive polling station where visitors were asked to respond “Yes” or “No” by paper ballot to whether Museum of Modern Art trustee and New York gubernatorial candidate Nelson Rockefeller’s support of Nixon’s policies in Vietnam would influence their decision to vote for him. The poll’s outcome was utterly contingent on visitor participation, and prompted a reconsideration of the supposedly “neutral” politics of the museum institution and of modern art in general. This panel asks about the legacy of systems theory for art since the 1960s. How might we use the concept of “open systems” to understand art works that were not explicitly responding to systems theory? What kinds of problems does art-as-open-system pose to the art institution or market? Does it retain its subversive potential? How do contemporary critical paradigms such as “relational aesthetics” or affect theory reflect the inheritance of open systems? This session examines the concept of open systems in relation to a wide range of art practices, including mail art, video art, conceptual art, computer art, Fluxus, intermedia, performance art, expanded cinema, sculpture and installation, feminist art, art and technology, land art, new media, and exhibitions. We welcome presentations by scholars, scientists, artists, and curators working on or at the intersection of art and systems.

Please submit a 1-2 page, double-spaced abstract and CV to cfilippone@millersville.edu and johannagosse@gmail.com by April 25th.


T F m
March 28, 2014