Asking Questions First: DML 2012, San Francisco, March 1st

Asking Questions First: DML 2012, San Francisco, March 1st


T F m
February 26, 2012

There is not a trace in us of that humble acceptance displayed by our parents, who were convinced that administrative issues were of utmost importance and who considered interaction with the state as something to be celebrated. We do not feel that respect, rooted in the distance between the lonely citizen and the majestic heights where the ruling class reside, barely visible through the clouds. Our view of the social structure is different from yours: society is a network, not a hierarchy. We are used to being able to start a dialogue with anyone, be it a professor or a pop star, and we do not need any special qualifications related to social status. The success of the interaction depends solely on whether the content of our message will be regarded as important and worthy of reply. And if, thanks to cooperation, continuous dispute, defending our arguments against critique, we have a feeling that our opinions on many matters are simply better, why would we not expect a serious dialogue with the government?


T F m
February 25, 2012

we do not want to pay for our memories. The films that remind us of our childhood, the music that accompanied us ten years ago: in the external memory network these are simply memories. Remembering them, exchanging them, and developing them is to us something as natural as the memory of ‘Casablanca’ is to you. We find online the films that we watched as children and we show them to our children, just as you told us the story about the Little Red Riding Hood or Goldilocks. Can you imagine that someone could accuse you of breaking the law in this way? We cannot, either.

‘We, the Web Kids,’ The Atlantic (via somethingchanged)

(The network is our memory, sorry, you don’t own that.)


T F m
February 25, 2012

They were just kids once too


T F m
February 24, 2012

8bitfuture:

Engineers build ‘pop-up robots’.

Harvard engineers have developed a new technique allowing robotic insects to be mass produced flat on a sheet, and then popped up. Inspired by pop-up books, the system has taken what used to be a painstaking production process to build the robots one at a time by hand, and turn it into a flawless automated process with virtually no error.

In prototypes, 18 layers of carbon fiber, Kapton (a plastic film), titanium, brass, ceramic, and adhesive sheets have been laminated together in a complex, laser-cut design. The structure incorporates flexible hinges that allow the three-dimensional product—just 2.4 millimeters tall—to assemble in one movement, like a pop-up book.

The implications of this novel fabrication strategy go far beyond these micro-air vehicles. The same mass-production technique could be used for high-power switching, optical systems, and other tightly integrated electromechanical devices that have parts on the scale of micrometers to centimeters.

Check out a video of the pop-up action, here.


T F m
February 22, 2012


T F m
February 22, 2012

1984 was a love story.

1984 was a love story.


T F m
February 22, 2012

theavc:

huffpostcomedy:

unlikelywords:

“It’s a damn travesty that we live in a world where gets to host for the 4th time – but remains snubbed.”

Kenny Fucking Powers clued me in to this stat and it was obvious people would need graphical evidence of this travesty. As I am inartistic, I got back up from Josh.

Important chart.

Consider us 100 percent in favor of Aziz hosting SNL


T F m
February 22, 2012

Lambeaux by Nicolas Boillot | TRIANGULATION BLOG

Lambeaux by Nicolas Boillot | TRIANGULATION BLOG


T F m
February 22, 2012

What if we could see and interact with the output of the code directly? Why isn’t coding more like drawing a picture? How does it come that traditional tools, like pen and paper, are still the benchmark when it comes to connecting the creator with her piece of work?


T F m
February 21, 2012