Profile: Eric Zimmerman

Ladies and gentlemen, people of the moving image, you are history. We are history. We’ll be replaced by people like Eric Zimmerman. Reason: the world is moving into an age that is characterized by Play, or, as Zimmerman puts it: The Ludic Century. Submarine Channel talked to the prominent game designer during Think, Design, Play, a conference organized by the Utrecht School of the Arts.

Zimmerman lectures and publishes extensively on games, including keynotes at major industry events. He is the co-author with Katie Salen of Rules of Play: Game Design Fundamentals, the definitive textbook on game design. Zimmerman has taught courses at MIT’s Comparative Media Studies Program, New York University’s Interactive Telecommunications Program and Game Center, Parsons School of Design’s MFA in Digital Technologies Program, and School of Visual Arts’ Design as Author MFA Program. He has exhibited game artworks at museums and galleries in the US and abroad. Visit his website for all his game activities.

Watch our profile and learn why games will lay the foundations for a systems thinking that is essential for solving the world’s big problems.

(by SubmarineChannel)


T F m
October 28, 2011

emergentdigitalpractices:

Off Book: Video Games | PBS Arts (by PBS)

Originally got this from Kotaku. If you still don’t think games can be art, I’ve got a 7 minute video for you.


T F m
October 28, 2011

Off Book: Video Games | PBS Arts (by PBS)

Originally got this from Kotaku. If you still don’t think games can be art, I’ve got a 7 minute video for you.


T F m
October 27, 2011

(via A “Living” Logo For Wikipedia, With More Than 3.2 Million Variations | Co. Design)


T F m
October 27, 2011


T F m
October 27, 2011


T F m
October 27, 2011


T F m
October 27, 2011

The eighteen-year-old soldier was a high school dropout who failed to qualify for the original position in the armed forces he’d applied for. It was suggested he try his hand at drone piloting, and according to Singer, “because of playing on video games, he was already good at it.” So good, in fact, that he was brought back from Iraq to become an instructor at a training academy.


T F m
October 27, 2011

The eighteen-year-old soldier was a high school dropout who failed to qualify for the original position in the armed forces he’d applied for. It was suggested he try his hand at drone piloting, and according to Singer, “because of playing on video games, he was already good at it.” So good, in fact, that he was brought back from Iraq to become an instructor at a training academy.


T F m
October 26, 2011

Jobs smiled warmly as he told them he was going after their market. “He said we were a feature, not a product,” says Houston. Courteously, Jobs spent the next half hour waxing on over tea about his return to Apple, and why not to trust investors, as the duo—or more accurately, Houston, who plays Penn to Ferdowsi’s mute Teller—peppered him with questions.

When Jobs later followed up with a suggestion to meet at Dropbox’s San Francisco office, Houston proposed that they instead meet in Silicon Valley. “Why let the enemy get a taste?” he now shrugs cockily. Instead, Jobs went dark on the subject, resurfacing only this June, at his final keynote speech, where he unveiled iCloud, and specifically knocked Dropbox as a half-attempt to solve the Internet’s messiest dilemma: How do you get all your files, from all your devices, into one place?

Houston’s reaction was less cocky: “Oh, s–t.” The next day he shot a missive to his staff: “We have one of the fastest-growing companies in the world,” it began. Then it featured a list of one-time meteors that fell to Earth: MySpace, Netscape, Palm, Yahoo. (via Dropbox: The Inside Story Of Tech’s Hottest Startup – Forbes)

In the November 7, 2011 issue of Forbes. Interesting how the online version precedes the paper version.


T F m
October 26, 2011