Kinect TV And Sesame Street Hack The Next Generation Of TV

Kinect TV And Sesame Street Hack The Next Generation Of TV


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October 31, 2011

Minecraft is the winner of a new arts award for computer games.

The prize was announced at the finale of the GameCity videogame culture festival in Nottingham.

The title is the work of an independent Swedish company, Mojang. Players have to build objects out of blocks in an open environment.

The game was selected over rivals from big name publishers, including Valve and Electronic Arts’ Portal 2 and Microsoft’s Ilomilo.

“It’s a great honour to be compared to those games,” said Markus Persson, Mojang’s founder.

“Winning this award helps us to try to make Minecraft the best game it can be.”

(via BBC News – Minecraft awarded GameCity videogame arts prize) more details at the click-through


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October 31, 2011

Rovio Entertainment has said it will open its first retail outlet this year.
Bloomberg has reported that the firm is aiming to hit $100 million in retail sales in the country in its first year of trading.
The chief marketing officer, Peter Vesterbacka said at the Techcrunch conference in Beijing: “China is our fastest-growing market, so we are taking it very seriously. We want to be more Chinese than Chinese companies.”
Rovio didn’t disclose how many store it was planning to open, or their locations, but the stores are set to offer the full range of licensed Angry Birds merchandise, including toys, apparel and dress-up.
Currently licensed goods are accounting for ten to 20 per cent of the business and the plush range is selling a million units per month. (via Angry Birds store set to open in China | Toy Industry | News by ToyNews)


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October 31, 2011

Digital art offers new hope for art at a time when the traditional media seem to have exhausted their potential.


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October 31, 2011


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October 31, 2011

Technology always has its festive upsides…

(via How to Creepify Your Photos for Halloween)


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October 29, 2011

I always forget how to fold this balloon. Evil Mad Scientist has a great project that embeds an LED, flexible circuit traces, and a battery to make a delightful lamp.


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October 29, 2011

The National Association of Theatre Owners estimates that 35-mm. projectors will be gone from American cinemas by the end of 2013.

Emily Eakin discussing the work of Tacita Dean whose art work and practice celebrates — and depends upon — film stocks that are no longer being manufactured. Eakin’s essay can be found in The New Yorker of October 31, 2011.

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October 28, 2011

Ian McEwan’s recent comic novel “Solar” includes, as a minor character, a conceptual artist whose latest work, constructed for Tate Modern, is a gargantuan Monopoly board with dice two metres high and houses that viewers can enter. The work—"an indictment, it was supposed, of a money-obsessed culture"—is a media sensation. What’s less clear is whether it’s good art.

Emily Eakins discussing the aesthetic and technical challenges of creating art work for the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall commission, in the New Yorker of October 31, 2011.

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October 28, 2011

http://video.google.com/googleplayer.swf?docid=-3857739359956666768&hl=en&fs=true

Google Tech Talks April 30, 2007 ABSTRACT World-renowned Science Fiction writer and futurist Bruce Sterling will outline his ideas for SPIMES, a form of ubiquitous computing that gives smarts and ‘searchabiliity’ to even the most mundane of physical products. Imagine losing your car keys and being able to search for them with Google Earth. This same paradigm will find you “wrangling” with product-lifecycle- management systems that do for physical objects what the iPod has done for music. These and other radical ideas are delivered in Sterling’s latest book`Shaping Things’. This concise book was written to inspire designers to visualize radical scenarios connecting information technology and sustainability in a new ecology of artifacts. Sterling suggests new connections between the virtual world and the physical world that will have you rethinking many of your assumptions about how we relate to products. He will be joined by Scott Klinker, 3-D Designer-in-Residence at Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, MI who leads a graduate design program known for giving form to experimental cultural ideas. Klinker’s own design work focuses on digital customization as industry shifts from mass production toward niche production in a networked society. The presentation will include an invitation for Sterlling and Klinker/ Cranbrook to team-up with Google to create a short documentary film that would portray a speculative future of life with SPIMES. Distributed online, this short film would convey the look and feel of SPIME scenarios as a provocation for widespread industry discussion about the new potentials of ubiquitous, ambient, searchable, geolocative products.

(via The Internet of Things: What is a Spime and why is it useful?)


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October 28, 2011