According to Eurogamer, the next project for legendary video game developer (and former SXSW keynote speaker) Will Wright will be based on the Bruce Sterling short story “Maneki Neko.” Interviewed at E3 in Los Angeles, Wright tells Wesley Yin-Poole that: “[Maneki Neko] describes a karmic computer that’s keeping a balance of payments between different people, and causing them to interact with each other in interesting ways to improve their lives even though they’re strangers. They earn karmic points that are redeemed by having somebody else help them.”
Wright adds that the Sterling-inspired game he’s working on is likely set for launch on tablets, smart phones and social networks such as Facebook. Learn more about Sterling’s unique perceptions of the future by watching Sterling’s 2011 closing keynote in the player above or listening to the audio recording of it here.


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June 30, 2011

According to Eurogamer, the next project for legendary video game developer (and former SXSW keynote speaker) Will Wright will be based on the Bruce Sterling short story “Maneki Neko.” Interviewed at E3 in Los Angeles, Wright tells Wesley Yin-Poole that: “[Maneki Neko] describes a karmic computer that’s keeping a balance of payments between different people, and causing them to interact with each other in interesting ways to improve their lives even though they’re strangers. They earn karmic points that are redeemed by having somebody else help them.”
Wright adds that the Sterling-inspired game he’s working on is likely set for launch on tablets, smart phones and social networks such as Facebook. Learn more about Sterling’s unique perceptions of the future by watching Sterling’s 2011 closing keynote in the player above or listening to the audio recording of it here.


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June 30, 2011

Keeping the lab tidy… First post! Welcome to MakieLab, where we are making toys and games that are designed to talk to each other. Toys and games that interface, toys produced locally and cleanly using emerging tech like 3D printing, and games that reflect the toy owned by the player. A bit of history to kick of with: MakieLab was fully formed a few months after Alice first stood up and talked about toys and games and 3D printing in the same cookpot at NESTA (London, UK) in January. In February, our first toy prototype came back from the print lab, and by March we were negotiating co-founder details – Luke Petre (tech) and Jo Roach (production) were in. GDC and the Toy Fair in the US took up some time. April & May were almost entirely funding-pitching and model-wrangling, plus equity meets and office searches and an ongoing search for an Art Director. (Get in touch if that’s you!). Our reworked model (a doll) came back from the printer, with an improved design, but broken-during-printing elbow joints. The R&D continues. And here we are in June, launching the corporate blog and the Twitter feed, as the MakieLab. We’re also announcing Sulka Haro joining the founding team from Sulake, makers of the teen phenomenon Habbo Hotel. Bios of the co-founders – Alice, Luke, Jo and Sulka – are on the Makies Team page. We also have the expertise of Nicholas Lovell as our non-exec, and a group of wonderful advisors – science fiction writers, innovators, game designers and makers. We’ll be posting our progress as we go here, and you can also follow us on Twitter at @makielab.


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June 30, 2011

sombreboite:

Doug McClintock


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June 30, 2011


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June 29, 2011

dinosaurparty:

(via Whitney Museum of American Art: Cory Arcangel: Pro Tools)

I saw the Cory Arcangel show for a whole 30 minutes (fast art is better than no art…maybe?). As a curator who has a pretty significant investment in the videogame medium, I’d been looking forward to this show, and it’s actually one of the reasons I decided to make the trip out to NYC. 

Cory Arcangel’s best-known piece is probably Super Mario Clouds (2002). I’m of the opinion that SMC often gets oversimplified by writers and curators, and I was hoping that Pro Tools at the Whitney would do more to contextualize Arcangel’s oeuvre. But instead, the show was mostly comprised of pieces from the last two years, which communicated more of a snarkiness than the insight I’d been looking for. Maybe spending another 30 minutes in the gallery might change all that.


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June 29, 2011

dinosaurparty:

(via Whitney Museum of American Art: Cory Arcangel: Pro Tools)

I saw the Cory Arcangel show for a whole 30 minutes (fast art is better than no art…maybe?). As a curator who has a pretty significant investment in the videogame medium, I’d been looking forward to this show, and it’s actually one of the reasons I decided to make the trip out to NYC. 

Cory Arcangel’s best-known piece is probably Super Mario Clouds (2002). I’m of the opinion that SMC often gets oversimplified by writers and curators, and I was hoping that Pro Tools at the Whitney would do more to contextualize Arcangel’s oeuvre. But instead, the show was mostly comprised of pieces from the last two years, which communicated more of a snarkiness than the insight I’d been looking for. Maybe spending another 30 minutes in the gallery might change all that.


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June 29, 2011

The court ruled 7-2 in Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Association (Case No. 08-1448) that the state’s attempt to shield young people from violence in video games violates the First Amendment guarantee of free speech. Writing for the majority, Justice Antonin Scalia said the high court had never permitted government to restrict violent speech directed to minors. From the bench, he noted that children and teenagers are exposed to violence in literature from a very young age, ranging from Grimm’s Fairy Tales to high school reading lists that include Homer’s Odyssey and William Golding’s Lord of the Flies. “In truth, the California act is the latest is a long series of failed attempts to censor violent entertainment for minors,” Scalia said, citing past efforts to restrict dime novels, movies, comic books, and music lyrics.


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June 28, 2011

The court ruled 7-2 in Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Association (Case No. 08-1448) that the state’s attempt to shield young people from violence in video games violates the First Amendment guarantee of free speech. Writing for the majority, Justice Antonin Scalia said the high court had never permitted government to restrict violent speech directed to minors. From the bench, he noted that children and teenagers are exposed to violence in literature from a very young age, ranging from Grimm’s Fairy Tales to high school reading lists that include Homer’s Odyssey and William Golding’s Lord of the Flies. “In truth, the California act is the latest is a long series of failed attempts to censor violent entertainment for minors,” Scalia said, citing past efforts to restrict dime novels, movies, comic books, and music lyrics.


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June 28, 2011

I’ve signed a contract with a wonderful publisher — a Penguin imprint called Avery Books — and a sharp and enthusiastic editor named Rachel Holtzman. One of the most thrilling moments of my life as a writer was walking into Penguin headquarters in Manhattan and seeing classic jackets for Jack Kerouac’s novels like The Dharma Bums framed on the wall. It was reading the exhilarating, compassionate, and perennially fresh poetry and prose of Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder and their friends that made me want to grow up to be a writer in the first place.

I’m not sentimental about old media vs. new media. Nothing will ever replace the sublime feeling of sanctuary created by the printed page, but I treasure the books on my Kindle too, particularly when I’m reading at 30,000 feet. What I love is words — storytelling, the flow of well-wrought sentences, the gradual unfolding of a long and thoughtful tale, the private communion with an author’s mind.

But now comes the hard part. It’s one thing to work up a 4000-word magazine feature and another to sit down and write a 100,000-word book. I’m acutely aware that I’ve been granted a precious opportunity to cast light on forgotten history and provide a platform for voices that are rarely heard. At the same time, I’m scared out of my wits that the two decades of journalism that have led up to this project have not prepared me to write a good book. I wake up at 3am staring into the darkness, wondering if I’ll have the skills, discipline, and inner resources to pull it off.

I’ve chosen to deal with my anxiety by tapping into the wisdom of the hive mind. I recently sent email to the authors in my social network and asked them, “What do you wish you’d known about the process of writing a book that you didn’t know before you did it?”


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June 28, 2011