tamarapoppy:

Colour Papercraft heels by Ndeur


T F m
March 29, 2011

Revealed: US spy operation that manipulates social media

Revealed: US spy operation that manipulates social media


T F m
March 29, 2011

Anyway, Rohrer’s challenge-winning Chain World design is now at the center of something of an interesting controversy. If you haven’t heard about it, catch up here. The most interesting thing about the debate is that even though it seems that Rohrer’s intentions for Chain World are being “subverted” (depending on whom you ask), this very sort of discussion and debate – what defines “good”, what is the fate of the “holy object”, who can participate, should money be involved and what principles are most important – is inherent to religion. I haven’t asked Rohrer about this but I have to think he was aware of the possibility that people would disobey his “rules” for Chain World, or that it would mutate in some fashion beyond his foreseeing. But that we’re still discussing the “chain of meaning” behind that little USB key is even more proof that his design was a success, I think. (via Sexy Videogameland: Chains Of Meaning

)


T F m
March 29, 2011

inkwell.vue.400 : State of the World 2011:
Bruce Sterling and Jon Lebkowsky permalink #68 of 156:
Bruce Sterling (bruces) Fri 7 Jan 11 02:14

“Abundance breaks more things than scarcity,” as Clay Shirky once abundantly said.
I used to be involved in the paper fanzine scene, so I was never much daunted by the supposed “barriers to entry” in publishing. If you ever read a “slush pile” for a traditional publisher, you became instantly aware that there were legions of people writing – even intelligent and hard-working people – whose writing just didn’t deserve any attention from publishers. It was no use making that stuff widely public, because only twenty people would read it – and they’d be the guy’s relatives, who would think, “Wow, my cousin, the published writer!”
Now we got blogs (for the time bein). The “writing” there is not what blogs have ever been about. The writing doesn’t much matter in blogs; the blogging matters.
The writing in my own blog isn’t much good. My blog’s ‘writing" consists mostly of wisecracks, sarcastic complaints and You Go Girl. It’s the LINKING that is important in a blog, not the “writing”. The screen-size snippets of prose are in a supportive position to the work of the blog as an entity on the Internet. Nobody goes to my blog to read Bruce Sterling’s sparkling prose. They just whip through the updated torrent of eldritch curiosities there. “My cousin the Augmented Reality guy.” “My cousin the Design Fiction guy.” Nobody reads all of it; my blog is like a cigar-box full of pinned, still-living bugs. If they find something hip they haven’t heard about, then they click on that and vanish. Sometimes they link back to it.
If I stopped performing that blog, everything in it would swiftly linkrot and die. Nobody’s gonna read that blog in 20 years, although I wrote books 20 years ago that are still read.


T F m
March 29, 2011

laughingsquid:

Plush Dinosaur Tails


T F m
March 28, 2011

At its California data center, Zediva has set up hundreds of DVD players. They’re automated, jukebox-style. You’re not just renting a movie; you’re actually taking control of the player that contains the movie you want. The DVD is simply sending you the audio and video signals, as if it were connected to your home with a really, really long cable. It’s kind of hilarious to think that this arrangement is the solution to the future of online movies: data centers stacked to the ceiling with DVD players. (And you think it’s hard for you to find the right remote on the coffee table?) This sneaky setup neatly explains how you get those languages, subtitles and director’s commentaries. It also explains why Zediva isn’t subject to the availability windows and restrictions that hobble the cheap movie services like Redbox and Netflix. Zediva is just buying dozens of copies of each popular movie on the day it comes out, and presto, it’s yours to rent by long distance.


T F m
March 28, 2011

spreading the ball around and playing fierce defense. As the final seconds ticked off, Coach George Karl broke into a grin watching an impressive game from his remade team. “It’s fun to play basketball the right way,” said Kenyon Martin, who scored 12 points. “It always has been, always will be.” Atlanta’s All-Star center, Al Horford, was envious after watching Denver pull away. “They really spread you out,” he said. “They have six or seven weapons. They’re a great team. We play like that at times. Other times, we don’t. We’d be a better team if we played like them.”


T F m
March 28, 2011


T F m
March 28, 2011

The Future of Manufacturing is Local – NYTimes.com

The Future of Manufacturing is Local – NYTimes.com


T F m
March 28, 2011

Werner Herzog’s approach to documentary filmmaking. – By Leo Robson – Slate Magazine

Werner Herzog’s approach to documentary filmmaking. – By Leo Robson – Slate Magazine


T F m
March 28, 2011