Design Observer

Design Observer


T F m
April 17, 2010

Consuming Kids part 1 of 7 (via MrAntiestablishment)


T F m
April 16, 2010

Digital Garden at Leetsdale event

Cultural Event Opportunity

The Digital Garden on Leetsdale community garden and digital media learning center hybrid, is having a sheet mulching and BYO BBQ day this Saturday (April 17th) from 10am-dark (weather permitting). This is a fantastic opportunity to learn about sustainable gardening, permaculture, and sheet mulching. The event will be at the project space, 4500 Leetsdale. We will go through the entire process together, and as the day goes along we will transition into lawn games and BBQ. Help support a DMS Graduate Student thesis projec and Kinda Collective artists collective. For questions please email lkacneja@gmail.com Thanks.

Leo Kacenjar
Digital Garden Leetsdale
Garden Coordinator


T F m
April 15, 2010

The Climate Crisis Recreational Vehicle | Beyond The Beyond

The Climate Crisis Recreational Vehicle | Beyond The Beyond


T F m
April 15, 2010

We’re pleased to announce the 2011 IxDA conference, to be held February 9-12, 2011 (Wednesday through Saturday), with pre-conference events on Wednesday the 9th.

The 2011 conference will be held in stunning Boulder, Colorado; Boulder boasts gorgeous scenery, outdoor adventures, and a vibrant design community. A call for participation will be posted in the summer of 2010. Registration is open now, though – be sure to register early, as the conference sold out in 2010!

Presented by IxDA in partnership with Boulder Digital Works (BDW)


T F m
April 14, 2010

100 Best Photoshop Tutorials From 2009 | Creative Nerds

100 Best Photoshop Tutorials From 2009 | Creative Nerds


T F m
April 13, 2010

How To Lose Friends: Botox – The Awl

Photo mashup, montage for cover of Radar magazine. Used for rhetorical weight. Nicole Kidman + Barbie (and maybe a torso of a curvy woman) = commentary on beauty, botox, and bosoms.


T F m
April 13, 2010

Anti-Consumerism that Sells: D.I.Y. Marketing Campaigns and the Charm of Cheap | Pivot

Anti-Consumerism that Sells: D.I.Y. Marketing Campaigns and the Charm of Cheap | Pivot


T F m
April 13, 2010

Museum of Outdoor Arts | EXHIBITIONS

Museum of Outdoor Arts | EXHIBITIONS


T F m
April 12, 2010

Persuasive Design Patterns
Posted on March 24, 2010 by Lloyd Morgan|Jump To Comments
The Design with Intent toolkit is a guide to help you design systems to influence a user’s behaviour. The author, Dan Lockton, has subtitled the toolkit 101 Patterns for Influencing Behaviour Through Design. Categorised into the following eight ‘lenses’ (ways to look at design and behaviour) the toolkit proves to be a fantastic resource for helping you persuade through design. Architectural (e.g. Segmentation and Spacing: Can you divide your system up into parts, so people only use one bit at a time?)
Errorproofing (previously) (e.g. Choice Editing: Can you edit the choices presented to users so only the ones ou want them to have are available?)
Interaction (e.g. Partial Completion: Can you show that the first stage of a process has been completed already, to give users confidence to do the next?)
Ludic (e.g. Unpredictable Rreinforcement: What happens if you give rewards or feedback on an unpredictable schedule, so users keep playing or interacting?)
Perceptual (e.g. Fake Affordances: Is there anything to be gained from making something look like it works one way, while actually doing something else (or nothing at all)?)
Cognitive (e.g. Social Proof: Can you show people what other users like them are doing in this situation, and which choices are most popular?)
Machiavellian (e.g. Anchoring: Can you affect users’ expectations or assumptions by controlling the reference points they have?)
Security (e.g. Peerveillance: What happens if users know (or believe) that what they’re doing is visible to their peers also using the system?)
From the introduction to v0.9 of the toolkit: You have a product, service or environment—a system—where users’ behaviour is important to it working properly (safely, efficiently), so ideally you’d like people to use it in a certain way. Or maybe you have a system where it would be desirable to alter the way that people use it, to improve things for users, the people around them, or society as a whole. How can you modify the design, or redesign the system, to achieve this: to influence, or change users’ behaviour?


T F m
April 12, 2010